By Lynnie Stein / October 21, 2018

How to trust a fairy

“You are never too old to set another goal or to dream a new dream.”

  • C.S. Lewis.
  • “Someday you will be old enough to start reading fairy tales again.

If you see a fairy ring

In a field of grass,

Very lightly step around,

Tiptoe as you pass;

“I don’t believe in magic.’
The young boy said.
The old man smiled.
‘You will when you see her.”
― Atticuspoetry

Last night fairies frolicked there,

And they’re sleeping somewhere near.

If you see a tiny fay

Lying fast asleep,

Shut your eyes and run away,

Do not stay or peep;

And be sure you never tell,

Or you’ll break a fairy spell.

Magical Fairy Quotes

“Trust a fairy and she will never betray you.”
Tinkerbell

Fairies and their tales are something that we cherish and desire every time we think about its fantastic world and the magic it holds.

“I am half living my life between reality and fantasy at all times,” as Lady Gaga describes it, we all are well aware of the magic fairytales have on our lives.  In a part of our childhood, we used to get astonished and amazed with the magic fairies and how they had magnificent power and strength to make a terrible evil go away.

Fairies not only showed us the amusing world through fairy tales, but they taught us how good always won over evil and inspired us never to stop believing in ourselves, the perfect story for a baby or child when growing up.

  • Roald Dahl, ‘The Minpins’.

“If you want your children to be intelligent, read them fairy tales.”

  • Albert Einstein.

“Fairies are invisible and inaudible like angels but their magic sparkles in nature.”

  • Lynn Holland.

Remember–when you come to play in the garden, you’ll never be alone. After the harvest … add salt and love. Let the bubbles begin, with the magic of the fermenting fairies (the invisible organisms). Once you fill your kitchen with bubbles, you will never be alone.

One of my favourite fairy books is If You See A Fairy Ring illustrated by Susanna Lockheart. This is a fun collection of fairy poems by authors from Shakepeare to Laura Ingalls Wilder. The illustrations are wonderfully detailed. Some of the pages open up and the little paper slats move to show a new image.

The poems are fun, light hearted and short, accompanied by engaging illustrations.

My fave poem in the collection is the one above by William Shakespeare.

“If you see the magic in a fairy tale, you can face the future.”

  • Danielle Steel.

What are names for cotton candy?

This cloud of sweetness goes by several other names depending which country you are in:

In my country it is – fairy floss – the food of the fairy
Egypt – candy floss
India – candy floss
Ireland – candy floss
Finland – fairy floss
France – babe à papa (papa’s beard)
Netherlands – suikerspin (sugar spider)
New Zealand – candy floss
South Africa – candy floss
Sri Lanka – candy floss
U.K. – candy floss

We make a special occasion one with spun coconut sugar and add rose water and sometimes dehydrated pomegranate shrub and lacto fermented brines like beet kvass. – Dried and pounded to a powder.

Fairy fruit – Cotton Candy grapes – Yes, this is real fruit that surprisingly tastes like the sugary snack without containing any added sugar.

Magic food, growing on the tree trunk and the branches of the tree!!

One of our jaboticaba trees are in full bloom. Nicknamed the ‘Brazilian grape tree’. The exotic South American fruit grows directly on the trunk and branches, has white flesh with a unique sweet flavour and tart tasting thin edible skin.

It is amazing how the fruit cover the tree trunk – they are rather magical.
We have 3 different varieties and they fruit at different times. They all taste so different. The edible skins contain a load of tannin – making them perfect for fermenting. The green/unripe ones (a little bit sad to not let them ripe – but they make an amazing spicy pickle). The ripe ones we eat real fast – however, when we have a big crop we turn into wine, fermented jelly and a layer in the rumtoph.

The ones in the pic are the most common, known as red jaboticaba (although it is more of a violet colour). The white variety are like a sour lychee and perfect for fermenting and the Grimal jaboticabas are very sweet – taste like fairy floss and those ones are best to eat straight from the trunk or branches.

Have you tasted them?

“Come fairies, take me out of this dull world. For I would ride with you upon the wind and dance upon the mountains like a flame.”

  • W.B Yeats, ‘The Land Of Heart’s Desire’.
“My heart has wings and I can fly. I’ll touch every star in the sky. So this is the miracle I’ve been dreaming of.”

As fairies are magic, they are capable of performing magic. This magic is much greater than some other beings who practice magic, as fairies are magical beings and have a more natural flow with the use of magic.

You would imagine magical scenes where nature embraces wee critters, soft light filters through enchanted forests, and ethereal fairies doze on dew-dappled leaves.

Eating fairy bread and sipping fairy floss kefir mocktail’s.

In Western European folklore, a fairy is a type of mythical being or legendary creature, a form of spirit, whose habitats are woodlands and gardens. Fairies resemble various beings of other mythologies, though even folklore that uses the term fairy offers many definitions. Sometimes the term describes any magical creature, including goblins or gnomes; at other times, the term only describes a specific type of more ethereal creature.

Some believe that fairies are all around us, if we only have the eyes to see. Perhaps we should believe in what we cannot see … and maybe then you’ll see it. That’s the power that the fairies give to us … the power to believe whole-heartedly in what we can’t see.

What are some of the magical things that fairies do?”; They paint the grass with morning dew and light the stars at night and transform the humble cabbage and salt to magical gut lovin’ goodness”; just for starters.

Xoxo Lynnie

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